[Dave Birch]  A couple of weeks ago the House of Commons Select Committee on Science and Technology released the report of its investigation into the handling of scientific advice with respect to the UK’s proposed national identity card.  This brought me the traditional 15 seconds of fame, as I was one of the six non-government witnesses examined by the committee.  Anyway, the chairman of the committe, Mr. Phil Willis  M.P., has kindly agreed to come along to the Forum in November to take part in the "Fantasy National ID Card" expert panel.

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The panel will comprise one of our principal consultants with considerable experience advising national governments on the ID cards, John Elliott, together with a representative from the NO2ID campaign, our good friend (and fellow witness) Jerry Fishenden from Microsoft and Phil.  The rules will be simple: no-one is allowed to bitch about anyone else’s ideas, no-one is allowed to moan about what the government or industry is or is not doing.  Everyone will get 5 minutes and three bullet points to outline a better suggestion for national identity management in the UK and then defend their ideas against the well-informed delegates.  The delegates and the moderator (me) will then vote on the proposed schemes and we will make a donation to the charity of choice of the winner.
The idea of the panel is to explore how things could work: as our old friend William Heath of  Kable puts it, wibbi (wouldn’t it be better if…).

2 comments

  1. Marvellous idea. But shouldn’t that read “Fantasy ID management service” in case we decide we want different tokens, or no tokens at all? It’s the capability we’re after, isnt it?

  2. Whoops, just read your own post two below on ID computers, so excatly the same point is on your mind. (The trouble when you read blogs backwards – they should have a “start at the beginning” button really)

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