[Dave Birch] As I blogged before, Consult Hyperion has joined forces with Identrust to sponsor the Digital Identity Forum track on “Identity is the new money” at this year’s European e-Identity Management conference in London on 9th-10th June 2010. Having been through the usual juggling as people drop in and out, get called away to meetings and mess up their calendars, the final line-up is now as fixed as it can possibly be:

The Digital Identity Forum: Identity is the New Money
Sponsored by Consult Hyperion and Identrust

Session 1: Chaired by John Bullard, Identrust

13:15 John Skipper, PA Consulting
13:45 Vincent Jansen, Innopay
14:15 Sonia Rossetti, RBS
14:45 Giles Sergant, Touch2ID

15:15 Tea

Session 2: Chaired by David Birch, Consult Hyperion

15:45 Expert Panel on the Identity Business

Joe Norburn, Identrust
Robin WIlton, FutureIdentity
Jan Dart, Bell ID
Todd Facemire, Barclays

16:45 Expert Panel on Identity and the Consumer

Peter Bradwell, DEMOS
Henry Potts, UCL
Marc Dautlich, Olswang
William Heath, MyDex

17:45 Close.

Look forward to seeing you there. By the way, the promotional code EID10DIF will give your delegates 20% OFF of one or two day passes.

One area for discussion will be the business models and structures that may emerge around identity, authentication and privacy. Unless there are some viable business models, I don’t expect to achieve much. We have to make it possible to go with the grain of business in order to achieve, simultaneously, more and privacy and more security.

Harper thinks that privacy is what economists call an “intermediate good,” meaning that it’s something like steel or a car engine, which consumers don’t want to buy separately. “People expect it to be built-in as a fireplace is built into a house,” he says. “They don’t want to go shopping for a fireplace when they buy a house.”

[From It’s been 10 years: Why won’t people pay for privacy? | Politics and Law – CNET News]

Is this right? I wonder if it this is the place for disruptive innovation — a change to a new, sustainable business model. If privacy were to become part of the customer proposition, in all sorts of services, then there might be some competition around it. There is no competition around intermediate goods: I didn’t buy my Volvo because of the make of the seat belts, I expect it to have seat belts and the Volvo brand saves me from having to investigate and test the seat belts myself. But if privacy is more important than seat belts, if you see what I mean, then it should step and become part of what is being sold.

Privacy isn’t the only component of a mass-market identity infrastructure: there are many factors that go to make that up, and we discussed many of them at the same event last year. But one idea that I will be testing with my panels at the event will be that privacy’s time has come: for a combination of reasons, now is the time to disrupt.

Technologists and policy-leaders, the world needs a fresh way of looking at privacy, one geared less at holding back the tide and more toward empowerment of the identity-holder.

[From Back to the future: so what if we have less privacy online? – Javelin Strategy & Research Blog]

I have called this before the shift from passive to active privacy, and there are many ways that this can be achieved. Personally, I’m pretty sure that some combination of (for example) MyDex, Barclays Identrust and Telefonica could do this, and they could it fairly quickly if there was a real push from somewhere.

See you on Wednesday.

These opinions are my own (I think) and are presented solely in my capacity as an interested member of the general public [posted with ecto]

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