Contact-free public transport (Part 3)

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This is the third of three blogs about technologies to support contact-free use of public transport.

The radio again – I hear that the Transport Minister for England had just reported that there have been fewer than 400 fines for people failed to wear face covering on public transport. More than 115,000 travellers have been stopped and reminded that face coverings are mandatory, and 9,500 people prevented from travelling.

Contact-free and App Clips in Apple’s iOS 14

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The Use of Contact-free is Accelerating

At Consult Hyperion, we have already seen the pandemic accelerate the adoption of contact-free payments in the face to face environment as customers have become wary of catching COVID by touching shared devices, such as self-service terminals and PIN pads.  The use of personal devices for payments is hardly new but the attraction of an in-app/in-store version of mobile payments, whereby the consumer uses an app on their own device to interact with the retailer or service provider and pay for services, has just increased dramatically. Solutions for parking (RingGo) and for restaurants (like the Wahaca app, powered by Judopay) were already demonstrating the benefits of such an approach for customers and businesses before COVID struck.

NFC! It is cool!

[Dave Birch] The chap who runs Philips Semiconductors, Frans van Houten, recently said that half of all new mobile handsets will come with NFC by 2010. Good news for Philips, who make the NFC chips. Then he sold just over 80% of the company to a consortium led by U.S.-based Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Company who, if I remember correctly (and a quick google reveals that I did), were the eponymous “Barbarians at the Gate”. So how are contactless and NFC looking?

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